13th Jun 09:12 GMT

Bringing the world of engineering and technology to life

Growing up, I wasn’t given good careers advice; I learnt through coincidence and accident how to get on – on a personal level, it is important to me to make sure that today’s students make careers decisions with their eyes open.

Jonathan Jowitt, Evangelist and Technical Expert, Dolby Laboratories

According to the Department for Culture, Media & Sport, the creative industries – which includes film, television and music – are worth £8 million an hour to the UK economy. These industries also account for over five per cent of UK jobs and are growing faster than all other sectors of UK industry.

For students that aren’t aspiring actors, actresses or musicians, engineering and technology is a great way into this thriving industry – yet one that is often overlooked when it comes to career choices, and the subject choices made at school that will give them the right qualifications.

Growing up, I wasn’t given good careers advice; I learnt through coincidence and accident how to get on – on a personal level, it is important to me to make sure that today’s students make careers decisions with their eyes open.

Looking at students today, there are two key things that concern me: making choices with too little information and not realising until late in life what opportunities a background in technology and engineering can deliver.

As a company that bridges this divide between the creative industries and engineering and technology, Dolby is keen to encourage students to think more about their career paths, as well as making STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) subjects a real consideration for them.

Dolby, and organisations like ours, needs to focus on bringing engineering and technology-based jobs to life. Speaking to students during workshops that we have run, it is hard for them to see how the physics and maths that they are learning in the classroom would apply to a job – or, more importantly, to a job they might actually want to do.

We get involved in schemes such as Careers Lab because they help bring career opportunities to life. We are also running a programme that sees us partner with schools to explore the application of their classroom physics in the film industry. This also lets students meet Dolby sound engineers who can talk through the career path that led them to working on the sound behind blockbuster movies. The aim: to broaden students’ horizons when it comes to career options.

Failing to support students in making informed choices by putting engineering and technology on their radar will result in a shortfall of qualified and engaged students coming through the education system.

Ultimately, a lack of talent will result in thriving industries such as the creative industries being unable to support potential growth, as well as robbing young people of the opportunity to work in exciting and rewarding roles. Working together, business and education can help to create a brighter picture.

 

 

 

New message
×
Sign in
×